Breeds

Choosing a Chinook - Chinook Breed Profile

Choosing a Chinook - Chinook Breed Profile

One of the more recent breeds, the Chinook is a rare breed of sled dog which likely began as a cross between a northern husky and a Mastiff mix. How rare is the Chinook? It is estimated that currently, about 800 Chinooks are registered, and about 100 puppies are born per year.

History and Origin of the Chinook

The Chinook breed was developed in the 1920s by a New Hampshire sled dog driver and enthusiast named Arthur Treadwell Walden. One of the puppies in the original litter was named Chinook and became the new breed standard. Chinook continued to help propagate this new breed until his death at age 12 during a sledding expedition.

Appearance and Size of the Chinook

Original Chinooks possessed a beautiful tawny coat, but colors may range from honey to reddish-gold. They may also have dark markings on their ears and muzzle. They weigh in at around 55-90 pounds and may be 21-27 inches in height.

Personality of the Chinook

While Chinooks may appear large, fearsome, and imposing, they are the furthest thing from it. They are calm, dignified, friendly, and loving. Not surprisingly, they are hard workers, thanks to their heritage as sled dogs. They interact well with other dogs and love to be active.

Home and Family Relations with the Chinook

Chinooks are known for their special affinity for children, and they crave love and affection from their humans. Families with active lifestyles would do well with a Chinook companion; they love hiking and would excel at dog sports like sledding. Their even personality helps them adapt to new situations easily.

Training of the Chinook

Because they are eager to please, the Chinooks are easily trained. They love to be rewarded with food, praise, or play, and are enthusiastic learners.

Grooming of the Chinook

Chinooks shed heavily twice a year for a couple weeks at a time. Frequent brushing during these seasons will help keep shedding under control. For the rest of the year, weekly brushing should be sufficient, along with regular nail trimming, ear cleaning, and teeth brushing.

Special Care of the Chinook

The Chinook does not require specialized care.

Common Diseases and Disorders of the Chinook

The following diseases or conditions have been reported in Chinooks:

  • Epilepsy
  • Hip dysplasia
  • Atopy
  • Cryptorchidism

    Life Span of the Chinook

    The average life span of the Chinook is approximately 12-15 years.